Rants and Raves – Of Dystopian Erotica…

Jessy's Book Club

I know, I know, I’ve been M.I.A… been having a crazy work month, so I spent my Sundays working or sleeping… nothing to rant or rave about :/ But today I felt less tired and more inspired…

excited barney <– what I look like 🙂

excitement fist pump <— what you should look like 🙂

Sooooo… today I’m raving about a series. Thing is, there are so many books I read and wonder why the whole world isn’t raving about them. I then make it my mission to get them more known 🙂 Ok, I’ve only done this once before, because usually I hope my reviews are enough, but sometimes I think a few words about a book might be what’s needed to get more people to read it.

The other day I chatted with a Goodreads friend about this series. We both agreed that it’s really exceptional yet we believe many of our friends…

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Jane Austen and the Subversion of Sexist Tropes (#AustenInAugustRBR)

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Sorry

Sorry I haven’t been posting been very busy. I swear I’ll starting post again soon.

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Write it now, part 32: I’m full of ideas, but have writer’s block. What gives?

Matthew Wright

I read a post the other day complaining about an apparent paradox. The post writer was brimming with good concepts – but couldn’t write any of them down.

He wasn’t alone. A lot of those who commented had the same problem. Nobody quite knew the answer.

In fact this is a common writing problem. We’re often flooded with big-scale ideas that create worlds and novel-length stories.Or non-fiction, if you’re thinking about the real world.

But that doesn’t automatically translate into written prose.

The reason is that we usually imagine concepts as a simultaneous idea – a picture (though it’s more than that).  Whereas writing is a linear thread which, counter-intuitively, has to be expressed in ways very different from how most of those who write actually think.

To get from idea to written text we have to break the content down into that thread – deconstruct ideas and inspirations. That’s where writer’s…

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The Fear of Becoming One’s Mother: Memoirs of a Drug Addict’s Daughter

The Bookshelf of Emily J.

“It is the declaration of every thinking woman at some point in her life, a manifesto that crosses all boundaries of class or color or whatever arbitrary thing we try to pretend separates us.  It starts out as a girlish whisper, grows louder with each passing year, until that faint promise we traced in the sand becomes a declarative, then an imperative:

I will not become my mother.

It’s an ambition born of fear” (p. 181).

This fear is palpable in Domenica Ruta’s memoir With or Without You (2013), which I could not put down (and not just because the title reminds me of dancing to U2 in high school).  She recounts her childhood as the daughter of a single mother who happens to be a drug addict.  Because Domenica, known as Nikki to her family and friends, is smart, I believed at first that this would be a story…

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How to Write a Dream Sequence

Read to Write Stories

Some writing teachers make a rule for stories submitted in workshop: No dreams. No dream sequences. They make this rule because badly written dreams are all the same. They “show” a character’s inner torments/thoughts rather than artfully imbedding them into the narrative. But if fiction is, in any way, supposed to imitate life, then dreams are fair game. The question is how to write them well.

Paul Yoon has written one of the best dream sequences I’ve ever read in his new novel Snow Hunters. You can read the first chapter here. The dream begins at the bottom of page 16.

How the Story Works

The passage begin with Yohan falling asleep and hearing sounds through the open window:

“the tapping of the rain and voices and a car and then a ship’s horn. A single chime of a church bell. a door opening. A song on the…

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When Your Best Friend Becomes Your Protagonist

101 Books

How many fictional characters in novels are based on real people?

I’d guess that it’s a large majority. I’ve never written a novel, so that’s just a hunch. Even if it’s just abstract or on a subconscious level, I think a lot of authors pull from their own experiences with other people when creating characters.

When The Paris Review interviewed E.M. Forster, author of A Passage To India, he said as much.

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